Category Archives: Macronutrient

Sources Of Fats

 Sources Of Fats can be divided into two types, animal fat and vegetarian fat.   this is  a brief description for each one.  Vegetarian Sources Of Fats: 1. Vegetables. Vegetables that contain fats (with the exception of coconuts) are are good sources of fats. Avocados and olives are two good examples. 2. Vegetable Spreads. Vegetable spreads can be used as substitutes for butter and margarine. Unlike butter, they contain little saturated fat and unlike margarine are not made from hydrogenated oils and are therefore free of trans fat. They're made from vegetables oils which have some positive health effects. 3. Oils. Olive and canola oils are rich in unsaturated fats. They are great substitutes to use for butter while cooking and add their own unique flavor to foods. 4. Nuts. Nuts contain high amounts of monounsaturated fats which have been shown to protect against cardiovascular disease. Nuts can be used as  great snacks which will help you get to your next meal without  eating  junk foods such as potato chips or doughnuts. Peanut butter also contains healthy fats. Animal  Sources Of Fats: 1.Animal fat extracted from the fat of the animal, such as: sheep, cow, camel ... and others. 2. Fish. Fish are rich in unsaturated fats. They also ...

Macronutrients

The three Macronutrients that are the major nutrients one’s body needs to survive. They are protein, carbohydrate and dietary fats. One requires to consume each of the 3 in fairly large quantities to facilitate optimal health. Protein.  Protein functions as one’s body’s building blocks. It’s in charge of building, maintaining & repairing all a person’s body’s cells. They are created from the chains of 22 amino acids, 8 of which are essential (as they are not produced by one’s body) while 14 are non-essential (as they could be produced by a person’s body). There is an unlimited number of protein kinds as they could be manufactured from any number & combination of the twenty-two amino acids. Then again, protein could be broken down into 2 major types: complete (holds all 8 essential amino acids) & incomplete (doesn’t contain all 8 essential amino acids). Aside from playing a major role in the production and preservation of healthy cells, they have other essential roles in one’s body. Protein assists in the synthesis of enzymes, antibodies and hormones, helps clot blood and controls several critical processes in one’s body. Carbohydrate. This macronutrient is a person’s body’s initial source of energy. Carbohydrates or carbs are made from ...

Macro-nutrients: The body’s energy supply

Macro-nutrients: The body's energy supply When one talks about a normal metabolic rate—being, on average, 25 to 30 kilocalories per kilogram of body weight per day (25-30 kcal/kg/d)—one is describing an average person's energy requirement: the energy necessary for cell function, muscle function, tissue repair. Macro-nutrients supply the energy, measured in calories, in this description: 55% to 60% from carbohydrates, 25% to 30% from fats, and 5% to 10% from proteins. In normal metabolism, proteins provide little of the energy used by the system, but rather the raw materials for protein synthesis that takes place in cell and muscle function and in tissue repair. Calories from carbohydrates that are above and beyond metabolic needs are stored as fats that can be called upon when the energy requirements of the body mandate. Exercise is an integral component of a healthy metabolism to prevent the storage of excess fats, as well as provide healthy stressors that beneficially challenge many parts of the overall system. A proper balance of macro-nutrients is necessary in a healthful diet, to provide the energy and raw materials the body requires to function optimally. Macro-nutrients, in the presence of adequate oxygen (to assist in energy production), micro-nutrients, and water, enter the ...

Macronutrient Recommendations

A diet that is balanced in its macronutrient distribution can help reduce the risk of disease and foster lasting weight loss.   Essential nutrients are not limited to vitamins and minerals. The major macronutrient —protein, carbohydrate and fat—are also essential to nutritional health and well-being. But who decides how much of any nutrient is needed to prevent a deficiency, reduce disease risk or create a healthy diet?   Since 1941, the National Academy of Sciences has periodically gathered a large group of experts to review the latest science and make recommendations. Until the late 1990s, the recommendations were called the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs). With the latest update of these recommendations, the term Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) has been used. The DRIs are a set of nutrient-based values that can be used to evaluate how "nutritious" a diet is.1 These include2: Estimated Average Requirement Recommended Dietary Allowance Adequate Intake Tolerable Upper Intake Level Estimated Energy Requirement Acceptable Macronutrients Distribution Range Acceptable Distribution A key component of the recommendation for macronutrients is how they are distributed in the diet; in other words, the percent of calories coming from protein, carbohydrate and fat. The DRIs express this distribution as the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range or AMDR. Acceptable  Distribution Ranges for Adults (as a percentage of ...