Category Archives: Essential Nutrients

Soluble Fiber

All You Need To Know About Soluble Fiber We all know that fiber is one of the more essential nutrients that you can get for your body. Roughly speaking, fibers are the indigestible contents found in plants. It is mainly responsible for cleaning up your intestines, preventing different digestive ailments from indigestion to cancers. But how well do you know your fiber? There are 2 types of fiber: insoluble fiber and soluble fiber. They act in different ways. While insoluble fiber is termed as metabolically inert, its soluble counterpart is known to cause fermentation in the intestine. In this article, we are going to focus on soluble fiber, its origins, its health benefits, and where you can actually find it. As a rule, soluble fiber acts by changing the nature of the contents of the digestive system, opening it up for fermentation. How is it possible? Fibers absorb water on the gastrointestinal tract, providing the perfect scenario for the initiation of fermentation. In contrast, while insoluble fiber also absorbs water while traveling along the gastrointestinal tract, what it only does is to create bulk, initiating defecation. While the action of insoluble fiber has its benefits, it is largely considered that soluble fiber ...

Nutrients in Motion

In order to live and survive, humans require nutrients from the food they eat to nourish bodily functions. These substances assist human growth from the cellular level. These key essential substances are vital for good nutrition and for the body to function well and prolong life.  Nutrients are acquired from all food products in but in varying amounts. Nutrients are divided into two categories, Macronutrients and Micronutrients. Macronutrients are the essential substances required by the body in generous amounts, thus the “Macro” prefix. These  include carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Everything edible contains variable amounts of each substance, except for calorie-free food. Macronutrients are considered “fuel” food because they are generally used by the body as energy sources. Carbohydrates consist of fiber, starch and sugar. Starches and sugars provide the energy required by the body to function. Extra amounts of carbohydrates are converted to fats. Fiber is the body’s “natural broom”. It gets rid of unhealthy cholesterol in the body. Fats act as protection of cells. It makes up the cell membrane. Fats are also essential for the brain and nerves to function normally. Extra fat can be used as energy. Proteins are the building blocks of tissues, which in turn build up ...

Essential Nutrients

Essential nutrients are nutrients required for normal body functioning that either cannot be synthesized by the body at all, or cannot be synthesized in amounts adequate for good health (e.g. niacin, choline), and thus must be obtained from a dietary source. Essential nutrients are also defined by the collective physiological evidence for their importance in the diet, as represented in e.g. US government approved tables for Dietary Reference Intake. Some categories of these include vitamins, dietary minerals, essential fatty acids, and essential amino acids.  For example, most mammals synthesize their own ascorbic acid, and it is therefore not considered an essential nutrient for such species. It is, however, an essential nutrient for human beings, who require external sources of ascorbic acid (known as Vitamin C in the context of nutrition). Many essential nutrients are toxic in large doses (see hypervitaminosis or the nutrient pages themselves below). Some can be taken in amounts larger than required in a typical diet, with no apparent ill effects. Linus Pauling said of vitamin B3, (either niacin or niacinamide), "What astonished me was the very low toxicity of a substance that has such very great physiological power. A little pinch, 5 mg, every day, is enough to ...

7 Nutrients Your Diet May Be Missing

Think your diet is healthy with essential nutrients ? Guess again. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans says many adults lack seven essential nutrients -- from calcium to fiber -- and certain groups of people are missing even more. Filling in so many nutrients gaps seems insurmountable without supplements, but more often than not, food can solve the shortfalls. Calcium: Essential Nutrients for Muscles, Bones, and More You don't outgrow your need for calcium just because you're all grown up. While calcium is necessary to bolster developing bones, it's also needed to keep your skeleton strong throughout life. And that's not all. Besides participating in maintaining a normal heart rhythm, calcium plays a role in blood clotting and muscle function. Studies have shown a link between adequate calcium intake and lower blood pressure, as well as weight control. The Institute of Medicine (IOM), the group of experts that sets quotas for essential nutrients has determined that calcium needs increase with age. Here's what you need every day: 19- to 50-year-olds: 1,000 milligrams 51 years and up: 1,200 milligrams Three servings of dairy foods each day, as part of a balanced diet, provides most people with the calcium they need. Try to get calcium from foods, preferably dairy. Calcium is ...

Nutrient

A nutrient is a chemical that an organism needs to live and grow or a substance used in an organism's metabolism which must be taken in from its environment. They are used to build and repair tissues, regulate body processes and are converted to and used as energy. Methods for nutrient intake vary, with animals and protists consuming foods that are digested by an internal digestive system, but most plants ingest nutrients directly from the soil through their roots or from the atmosphere. Organic nutrients include carbohydrates, fats, proteins (or their building blocks, amino acids), and vitamins. Inorganic chemical compounds such as dietary minerals, water, and oxygen may also be considered nutrients. A nutrient is said to be "essential" if it must be obtained from an external source, either because the organism cannot synthesize it or produces insufficient quantities. Nutrients needed in very small amounts are micronutrients and those that are needed in larger quantities are called macronutrients. The effects of nutrients are dose-dependent and shortages are called deficiencies.   See healthy diet for more information on the role of nutrients in human nutrition.   Types of nutrient Macronutrients is defined in several different ways. The chemical elements humans consume in the largest quantities are carbon, hydrogen, ...